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Elijah Hall
Elijah Hall

Security Analysis


Security testing of Oracle code includes both functional and non-functional activities for verification of product features and quality. Although these types of tests often target overlapping product features, they have orthogonal goals and are carried out by different teams. Functional and non-functional security tests complement each other to provide comprehensive security coverage of Oracle products.




Security Analysis



Note that under Oracle Software Security Assurance, Oracle will not provide customers security test results or other sensitive security assurance artifacts. Additionally, Oracle will not submit its products to third-party static code assessment. For more information, see MOS Article: General Instructions for Submitting Security Questionnaires to Oracle (Doc ID 2337651.1) .


Functional security testing is typically executed by regular product QA teams as part of normal product testing cycle. During this testing, QA engineers verify conformance of implemented security features to what had been previously agreed upon in the functional specifications during the architectural and checklist reviews process.


Security assurance analysis and testing verify security qualities of Oracle products against various types of attacks. There are two broad categories of tests employed for testing Oracle products: static and dynamic analysis, which are further described in the sections below. These tests fit differently in the product development lifecycle and tend to find different categories of issues, so they are used together by Oracle product teams.


Static security analysis of source code is the initial line of defense used during the product development cycle. Oracle uses a commercial static code analyzer as well as a variety of internally developed tools, to catch problems while code is being written. Products developed in programming languages and platforms (J2EE, .NET) are scanned to identify possible security issues. This type of checking works very well for identifying buffer overflows and memory leaks in C/C++ code, resource handling issues in J2EE and .NET, finding improper credentials handling, various injections, incorrect system configurations, and so on. One of the drawbacks of this type of analysis is a high level of false positive reports; that is, quite a few of the reported items do not constitute a real issue. Typically, analysis of these scan reports involves senior engineers from the product teams who are well-familiar with the product code sorting out false positives from real issues, and reducing the number of false positives.


Dynamic analysis activity always takes place during latter phases of product development: at the very least, the product or component should be able to run. Although this may vary among Oracle organizations, typically this activity is handled by a security QA team (or a similar dedicated group), and may be shared by multiple product teams. Dynamic analysis is aimed at externally visible product interfaces and APIs, and frequently relies on specialized tools for testing. Both manual and automatic tools are used for testing within Oracle. Automatic tools employ fuzzing technique to test network-accessible product interfaces and protocols, while manual tools require making the modifications by hand, but allow for much greater accuracy and precision.


This outstanding reference has already taught thousands of traders the concepts of technical analysis and their application in the futures and stock markets. Covering the latest developments in computer technology, technical tools, and indicators, the second edition features new material on candlestick charting, intermarket relationships, stocks and stock rotation, plus state-of-the-art examples and figures.


Importantly, ASAP seeks individuals with a strong desire and commitment to learn the applied science of security analysis and portfolio management. You can demonstrate your commitment in your application in numerous ways. Some of these are to provide evidence of: (i) passage of the first-level Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) exam, (ii) a facility with applied financial modeling, (iii) prior coursework in investments, security analysis, and financial accounting, (iv) active participation in an investment club (such as the Capital Management Club at the UW-Madison), (v) experience as either an intern or full-time employee in an asset-management company, and/or (vi) a desire and willingness to compete in activities such as competitive sports and games.


Few realize that Ben Graham, the father of security analysis, eventually embraced efficient markets. Why did the man who literally wrote the book on investing throw it all away at the end of his life?


Economic, political, and social well-being in the world depend crucially on secure communication infrastructures. Present communication is secured through encryption techniques, relying on pre-shared key and cryptographic protocols built on the computational difficulty of certain mathematical problems, for example, the RSA public key scheme1. There are potential dangers with the present secure communication system. On one hand, these cryptographic protocols are based on mathematically difficult problems that are not rigorously proven to have no efficient solution algorithms. These protocols may be broken one day, or might have been broken privately already by some genius; we do not yet know whether efficient algorithms for solving these problems exist. On the other hand, some cryptography may become insecure with the rapid development of supercomputers and the prospect of practical quantum computers2. In contrast to cryptographic algorithms, physical-layer security is based on the conditions that the eavesdropper has unlimited computing power, but the legitimate receiver has a physical advantage over the eavesdropper. In 1975, Wyner presented a degraded wiretap channel model3, which is a basic channel model when security is concerned. Secrecy capacity is defined as the supremum of all the achievable transmission rates with security and reliability. For classical communication, estimation of the secrecy capacity in a practical communication system is hard, because it is difficult for the legitimate parties to detect eavesdropping. When quantum systems such as single photons or entangled pairs of photons are used to transmit digital information, quantum physics principles give rise to novel capability unachievable with classical transmission media4. It is impossible in principle for Eve to eavesdrop without disturbing the transmission so as to avoid detection. The first quantum communication protocol, proposed by Bennett and Brassard (BB84)5, showed how to exploit quantum resources for secure key agreement. Quantum-key distribution5,6,7,8,9 distributes a random key, rather than the information itself, and the information is sent through another classical communication channel.


Because of imperfect efficiency of the detectors and channel loss, Bob cannot receive all the qubits. Gottesman has proven the security of the Bennet-Brassard quantum-key-distribution protocol in the case in which the source and detector are under the limited control of an adversary23. Similarly, considering the detectors and channel loss, the maximum mutual information between Alice and Eve becomes


For any wiretap channel, if the secrecy capacity is non-zero, i.e., if the legitimate receiver has a better channel than the eavesdropper, there exists some coding scheme that achieves perfect secrecy3. Not all coding schemes can guarantee the security; the security depends on the details of the coding.


It is well-known that in quantum communication, photon loss is very high due to inefficient photon sources, high channel loss and low detector efficiency. To guarantee the reliability and security of transmission for QSDC, we designed a coding scheme based on the concatenation of LDPC codes, with preprocessing based on the universal hashing families (UHF)29.


R.Q., Z.L., P.N., J.G. and G.-L.L. designed the protocol and the optical circuits, and setup the physical layout. Z.S., W.H., L.S., Q.H., L.Y. made the LDPC coding and pseudo-M series. R.Q., Z.L., L.Y. and G.-L.L. completed the security analysis. L.Y. and G.-L.L. supervised the project. G.-L.L. led the entire project. All authors contributed to the writing of the paper.


Professional technical analysts typically accept three general assumptions for the discipline. The first is that, similar to the efficient market hypothesis, the market discounts everything. Second, they expect that prices, even in random market movements, will exhibit trends regardless of the time frame being observed. Finally, they believe that history tends to repeat itself. The repetitive nature of price movements is often attributed to market psychology, which tends to be very predictable based on emotions like fear or excitement. "}},"@type": "Question","name": "What's the Difference Between Fundamental and Technical Analysis?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "Fundamental analysis is a method of evaluating securities by attempting to measure the intrinsic value of a stock. The core assumption of technical analysis, on the other hand, is that all known fundamentals are factored into price; thus, there is no need to pay close attention to them. Technical analysts do not attempt to measure a security's intrinsic value, but instead, use stock charts to identify patterns and trends that might suggest what the security will do in the future.","@type": "Question","name": "How Can I Learn Technical Analysis?","acceptedAnswer": "@type": "Answer","text": "There are a variety of ways to learn technical analysis. The first step is to learn the basics of investing, stocks, markets, and financials. This can all be done through books, online courses, online material, and classes. Once the basics are understood, from there you can use the same types of materials but those that focus specifically on technical analysis. Investopedia's course on technical analysis is one specific option."]}]}] Investing Stocks Bonds Fixed Income Mutual Funds ETFs Options 401(k) Roth IRA Fundamental Analysis Technical Analysis Markets View All Simulator Login / Portfolio Trade Research My Games Leaderboard Economy Government Policy Monetary Policy Fiscal Policy View All Personal Finance Financial Literacy Retirement Budgeting Saving Taxes Home Ownership View All News Markets Companies Earnings Economy Crypto Personal Finance Government View All Reviews Best Online Brokers Best Life Insurance Companies Best CD Rates Best Savings Accounts Best Personal Loans Best Credit Repair Companies Best Mortgage Rates Best Auto Loan Rates Best Credit Cards View All Academy Investing for Beginners Trading for Beginners Become a Day Trader Technical Analysis All Investing Courses All Trading Courses View All TradeSearchSearchPlease fill out this field.SearchSearchPlease fill out this field.InvestingInvesting Stocks Bonds Fixed Income Mutual Funds ETFs Options 401(k) Roth IRA Fundamental Analysis Technical Analysis Markets View All SimulatorSimulator Login / Portfolio Trade Research My Games Leaderboard EconomyEconomy Government Policy Monetary Policy Fiscal Policy View All Personal FinancePersonal Finance Financial Literacy Retirement Budgeting Saving Taxes Home Ownership View All NewsNews Markets Companies Earnings Economy Crypto Personal Finance Government View All ReviewsReviews Best Online Brokers Best Life Insurance Companies Best CD Rates Best Savings Accounts Best Personal Loans Best Credit Repair Companies Best Mortgage Rates Best Auto Loan Rates Best Credit Cards View All AcademyAcademy Investing for Beginners Trading for Beginners Become a Day Trader Technical Analysis All Investing Courses All Trading Courses View All Financial Terms Newsletter About Us Follow Us Facebook Instagram LinkedIn TikTok Twitter YouTube Table of ContentsExpandTable of ContentsWhat Is Technical Analysis?Understanding Technical AnalysisUsing Technical AnalysisUnderlying AssumptionsTechnical vs. Fundamental AnalysisLimitations of Technical AnalysisChartered Market Technician (CMT)Technical Analysis FAQsInvestopediaInvestingTechnical Analysis: What It Is and How to Use It in InvestingBy 041b061a72


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